Innovation in Practice Blog

July 3, 2017

Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and The Total Eclipse of the Sun

The United States Postal Service has just released a “first-of-its-kind” stamp that changes appearance when you touch it. What has inspired this small nugget of innovation? […]
June 16, 2017

Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and High Heels

A great example of the Attribute Dependency Technique can be found at My Place Café & Bar at the Hilton Osaka hotel in Japan. Attribute Dependency […]
June 9, 2017

Innovation Sighting: LG’s New Smart Vacuum Doubles as a Home Security System

The rush to put new technology in the home is heating up like never before. Challengersinclude Amazon (Echo), Google (Home), and soon we’ll have Apple’s Siri […]
June 1, 2017

Solution-to-Problem Innovation

Innovation is the process of taking an idea and putting it into practice. Creativity, on the other hand, is what you do in your head to […]
May 8, 2017

Purdue University Students Dominate Using SIT

Recently, I was delighted to receive a message from my friend, Frank Grunwald, Visiting Lecturer at Purdue University, telling me of his plans to incorporate Systematic […]
April 27, 2017

More Than A Dream: Advanced Technology And Creating A Risk-Free Market

By Carol Ozemhoya, Contributing Editor at Vector Some people worry about technology costing people jobs and taking over the world as has been portrayed in many […]
April 17, 2017

Innovation Leadership: Managing Your Resources

As an innovation leader, you are now responsible for a bundle of resources that you’ll need to get the job done. Those resources include human resources – […]
April 4, 2017

Innovation Sighting: The Mahabis Slipper and the Division Technique

We all know the endless kick-on, kick-off routine associated with that perfectly comfortable pair of house slippers. Our days are filled with quick trips to the […]
March 23, 2017

What’s In a Name? New Research Suggests We Look Like Our Name

What’s in a name? Perhaps more than we might think, according to researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Most of us are familiar with the […]
March 20, 2017

Segmentation is Killing Your Brand: Five Reasons To Find Your Unicorn Customer

by Deb Gabor A store is a place you go to buy stuff, usually out of convenience or habit. In contrast, brands inspire irrational loyalty and […]
September 20, 2016

Why Apple Will Maintain Its Innovation Momentum

Apple’s successful launch of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus leaves people wondering if the superstar company has lost its innovative edge. The market is anxious […]
January 25, 2016

The Wheel: A Great Innovation?

People who believe that the wheel is the greatest invention ever assume two things: That it was wholly new when it was invented, and that is was so wonderful that people adopted it immediately. Historically, neither is true.
February 23, 2015

Teaching Children the S.I.T. Method

My seventh-grade son asked me to volunteer at his school to teach something nonacademic and fun, like how to rollerblade, bake cookies, and so on. I called the school and asked if I could teach a course called “How to Be an Inventor.” I had taught Systematic Inventive Thinking in many innovation workshops for about four years at that point, so I was confident I could deliver a fun and useful program for kids. To my surprise, the school administrators said no.
October 27, 2014

Innovation Sighting: Task Unification in Kitchenware

Many "wearable tech" devices measure the calories you burn in a day. But weight watchers know that's only half the equation. You also need an accurate count of calories consumed. Now a new device will do just that. It's called Vessyl, a cup that will not only identify and track what you drink and how much of it, but also sense the liquid type. It will transform how we consume every ounce of liquid throughout the day.
July 28, 2014

Philips study reveals that most North Americans think they are sitting on the “next big thing”

Philips North America announced the launch of the second annual Philips Innovation Fellows competition, in conjunction with the release of its 2014 North America Innovation Report. According to the report, nearly two-thirds of North Americans consider themselves innovators, of which a majority (72 percent) believe they are sitting on an idea for “the next big thing,” and just need money and ‘know how’ to develop it. The Philips Innovation Fellows Competition awards mentoring and $100,000 in cash prizes to inspire would-be entrepreneurs to bring their ideas to life by entering the competition.
May 26, 2014

Filtering Ideas to Find the Very Best Ones

The SIT Method is designed to help you generate lots of ideas in a systematic way. But how do you select which ideas to pursue? Filtering ideas is an essential part of the creativity process. You want to make sure you spend your time only on those with the most potential.
May 12, 2014

The Myth of Serendipitous Innovation

With so many successful products created through serendipity, it makes you wonder whether companies can rely on it to create breakthrough products. The answer is no. Serendipity, as a method of innovation, has a very poor track record. The number of serendipitous products is a tiny percentage of the total of all products. It just doesn't yield nearly the amount of blockbuster products as you would think. So why does it seem there are so many of them? That’s because serendipitous products are more memorable than others. We hear about them in the news media more often. Because of that, we recall more examples of serendipitous products than other inventions. So we’re fooled into thinking they must be occurring at a much higher rate. It just isn’t true.
January 13, 2014

Systematic Innovation at the Consumer Electronics Show

One way to develop your expertise in SIT techniques is with pattern spotting. A key premise of SIT is that for thousands of years, innovators have used patterns in their inventions, usually without even realizing it. Those patterns are now embedded into the products and services you see around you, almost like the DNA of a product. You want to develop your ability to see these patterns as a way to improve your use of them. There's probably no better place to practice pattern spotting than at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). In last week's CES in Las Vegas, "manufacturers demonstrated a range of previously mundane but now smart, web-connected products destined to become part of daily domestic existence, from kitchen appliances to baby monitors to sports equipment," as reported in The Independent.
December 30, 2013

The Top 10 Most Underappreciated Inventions

The end of the year is a popular time to publish lists of all sorts. A quick glance at CNN, for example, revealed lists such as "75 Amazing Sports Moments," "The 50 Best Android Apps," "8 Very Old Sites in the New World," and many more. Here is The Top 10 Most Underappreciated Inventions. The criteria for making this list are: 1. the invention has to be of high value, 2. we take it for granted; we just expect it to be there, and 3. it would be hard to imagine life without it; the substitute for the invention would be unacceptable.
April 22, 2013

New Ideas Light Up the Brain

Brain measuringCanadian researchers found that areas in the reward center of the brain became active when people hear a song for the first time. The more the listener enjoys what they are hear, the stronger the connections are in the region of the brain called the nucleus accumbens. The study is published in the journal Science.