Innovation in Practice Blog

July 9, 2018

Breaking Fixedness: Saving the Boys of the Thai Soccer Team Trapped in a Cave

News of a boys soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand brought back memories of the Chilean miners trapped 2,300 feet underground in August 2010. […]
June 25, 2018

Making Big, Bold Assertions to Drive Design Strategy

By Jon Kolko Design strategy is built on assertion. On the way to a great design strategy is the creation of a series of value assertions: […]
June 11, 2018

Innovation Sighting: Attribute Dependency and the Shape-Shifting Mannequin

Robotics and Fashion Design are two industries not typically paired together. Designer Audrey-Laure Bergenthal has done just that by designing a robotic mannequin that can change size […]
June 1, 2018

Innovation Sighting: Digital License Plates Using Task Unification and Attribute Dependency

A digital license plate that can change display and track the vehicle is currently being tested in California. 116 of these innovative tags that come with […]
May 1, 2018

Innovation Sighting: Amazon’s New Delivery – The Division Technique in Action 

Amazon.com Inc., the largest internet retailer in the world, is paving the way for another delivery option by bringing packages directly to a customer’s car. As […]
April 9, 2018

Innovative Advances in Pricing

ORIS Intelligence released the following update in mid-March, providing strategic information for Houseware manufacturers. Pricing Violations Heating Up in Housewares Industry: ORIS Intelligence Reveals New Insights […]
March 20, 2018

Register Now: Design Your Innovation Blueprint at Columbia Business School

The Columbia Business School Executive Education program is, once again, partnering with SIT to bring Design Your Innovation Blueprint: Leveraging Systematic Inventive Thinking. Registration is now […]
March 14, 2018

Innovation Sighting: Task Unification in Samsung’s New Smart TV

Imagine no longer deliberating between trendy art, your favorite photos, or the nonnegotiable family TV for your prominent living room wall. Samsung’s new 2018 QLED TVs […]
February 20, 2018

Innovation Sighting: Task Unification in Cars That Advertise

Imagine pulling out of the driveway for your regular jaunt to the grocery store. While turning the corner to exit your neighborhood the car console screen […]
February 12, 2018

Calling All Nominations: PDMA OCI Award

Nominations are underway for PDMA’s 31st annual Outstanding Corporate Innovator Award (OCI), which has become the premier honor for industry innovators. The OCI Award selection process […]
January 7, 2013

The Fabulous Five

Five companies are slugging it out in what may be the most competitive and unique business battle of all time. It is larger in scale with more at stake than battles in other industries including transportation, energy, and finance. More remarkable is how different the combatants are from one another. Instead of similar companies competing (Toyota versus General Motors, for example), these companies hail from different business bases: an electronics manufacturer, a lifestyle computing company, an online retailer, a search engine, and a social network. In order: Samsung, Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook. I call them the Fabulous Five.
October 8, 2012

Innovation Sighting: SIT Patterns in the Next Wave in Digital Photography

It might surprise you that a single innovation pattern, Multiplication, formed the premise of all photography. The cameras you use today evolved from multiplication. The entire photography industry continues to benefit thanks to this powerful pattern. Multiplication is one of five simple patterns innovators have used for thousands of years. These patterns are the basis of Systematic Inventive Thinking, a method that channels your thinking and regulates the ideation process. The method works by taking a product, service, or process and applying a pattern to it. This changes the starting point. It morphs the product into something weird, perhaps unrecognizable. With this altered configuration (we call the Virtual Product), you work backwards to link it to a problem that it addresses or new benefit it delivers. The process is called Function Follows Form.
September 30, 2012

The LAB: Innovating Pinterest with Attribute Dependency (September 2012)

It's official. Pinterest has joined the elite group of social apps along with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Youtube, and Google Plus. "Pinterest is a Virtual Pinboard that lets you organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web." How popular is it? It is the fastest site ever to break through the 10 million unique visitor mark. A report by Shareaholic claims, “Pinterest drives more referral traffic than Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube combined.” As of March 2012, Pinterest was valued at $1.5 billion. There are many creative ways to use Pinterest. New apps are emerging around it much like what happened with Twitter. But to maintain growth, Pinterest needs innovation. For this month's LAB, we will apply Attribute Dependency, one of five techniques of Systematic Inventive Thinking, to Pinterest. Our goal will be to create new innovations around Pinterest as we did with Twitter and Facebook.
September 10, 2012

Adding Value to Your Marketing Efforts

For information and registration, click here: Adding Value to Your Marketing Efforts
September 3, 2012

Innovation Sighting: Apple’s Use of Attribute Dependency in iPhones

"The Quiet TimeTM Universal System turns cell phones off automatically in designated areas such as theaters, hospitals, doctor's offices, and business meeting rooms. Our patented technology converts your incoming calls to text messages and alerts the cell phone owner." This may sound like the latest gizmo you would see at the Consumer Electronics Show. It is actually an invention created by my students using Systematic Inventive Thinking...in 2007, the year the iPhone was first released. Five years later, Apple has been awarded a patent described as an "apparatus and methods for enforcement of policies upon a wireless device." It reveals a way to change aspects of a mobile device based on certain events or surroundings.
August 6, 2012

Innovation in the Mobile World

The rapid adoption of smartphones is changing the landscape of the marketing research industry. Last month’s “Market Research in the Mobile World” conference in Cincinnati highlighted many ways the market research industry is trying to adjust. The industry is evolving from using lengthy printed surveys and personal interviews to instead collecting consumer reactions “in the moment” that are transmitted digitally as it happens. What was once a process of collecting “many answers from few” is becoming a process of collecting “a few answers from the many.” With their trusty appliance in hand, consumers can now share what’s on their mind virtually any part of their day. Not only is data received faster, it is also more reliable by sampling smaller bites from a larger pool.
April 16, 2012

Innovation Sighting: Yahoo’s e-Book Advertising

Yahoo's recent patent filings suggest it is entering the e-Book market, a move that will pit it against Amazon, Apple, and other content providers. But given the nature of the patent filings, Yahoo seeks to leap over the competition with a potentially more innovative approach. Yahoo's concepts conform to the Attribute Dependency technique, one of five in the SIT Method. Research shows that new products that conform to one of the five SIT techniques tend to be more successful in the marketplace.
February 27, 2012

The LAB: Innovating Twitter with S.I.T. (February 2012)

Twitter continues to evolve with some 220 million users tweeting collectively 250 million times a day. It is a vast social network that has become the world's "listening post" for events happening everywhere. Major news organizations rely on Twitter to give early warning to breaking stories. For this month's LAB, we will apply all five techniques of Systematic Inventive Thinking to Twitter. Our goal will be to create new features and innovations with the main Twitter platform as well as to create completely new applications related to Twitter. Many "apps" tied to Twitter already exist, and you can find a thorough inventory here.
October 24, 2011

Academic Focus: John Hauser and the MIT Team

This month's Academic Focus features Professor John Hauser and the highly-regarded team at MIT. Perhaps no other university in the world stands for innovation as much as this one. MIT is an innovation powerhouse because of the way the faculty looks at innovation through multiple lens and collaborative approaches. MIT is great blend of innovation research, technology research, and commercialization research.
August 29, 2011

The LAB: Innovating Software Applications with S.I.T. (August 2011)

Software runs much of our lives. It runs everyday items like computers, automobiles, banking, telephones, and even kitchen appliances. Software will affect more of our daily routines in the future. According to market researcher DataMonitor, the global software market will grow to $457 billion, an increase of 50.5% since 2008. The problem with software is you cannot see it. The term was coined originally as a prank to contrast the term, "hardware." Unlike hardware, software is intangible - it cannot be touched. So how do you innovate software especially with a corporate innovation method like S.I.T.? This method uses the components of the product or service as the starting point. Companies sometimes struggle creating new applications because software seems too abstract. The secret to using S.I.T. on software is this. Don't innovate the software code; rather, use the innovation method on what the software does. Apply the method to the products and processes that the software affects. This will create new-to-the-world innovations. Then, write the software code that implements these new applications. Here is an example with the software program, Quicken. We start with a component list of a routine process within the software - creating an invoice.