Innovation in Practice Blog

September 22, 2020

Fixedness: Your Main Barrier to Creative Thinking

How do you develop your creativity? As much as you want to or need to be creative, sometimes, there’s something that seems to block it. And […]
September 15, 2020

Process Innovation: Unlocking New Value in What You Do Everyday

The Systematic Inventive Thinking or SIT method is not only applicable to products, it’s also highly valuable in innovating services and processes.  Here are two ways […]
September 8, 2020

Innovation Dream Teams: The Secret Formula to Drive Team Success

When you’re talking about innovation, a traditional brainstorming approach doesn’t work. If you want to generate better ideas, you have to be able to create your […]
September 1, 2020

Why People Resist Our Innovative Ideas and How To Overcome It

With innovation comes resistance. They define each other. An idea simply cannot be innovative unless it’s met with resistance. Because of this, we should see resistance […]
August 25, 2020

How to Use the Closed World Principle of Creativity

Creative thinking can be systematic and routine. All you have to do is learn how to use your brain and learn a new way to generate […]
August 18, 2020

Divide and Conquer – How to Use the Division Technique

A common misconception is that creativity is a gift you are born with. People believe that if they don’t have it right from birth, they have […]
August 11, 2020

A Path to More Creative Thinking

Innovation is a skill. It’s not a gift. It’s not something you’re born with. But you can actually learn to be creative like you could learn […]
August 10, 2020

Task Unification – The Go-To Innovation Tool to Break Functional Fixedness

Mankind has used patterns for thousands of years to solve everyday problems. Those patterns are now embedded into the products and services you see around you […]
December 9, 2019

How to Enhance Innovation with Learning and Development Training

by Max Maccarone Innovation is an inescapable fact of being in business in today’s market. Advancements and developments in technology mean that nearly every industry has […]
August 13, 2019

Moms Who Dominate the Closed World Principle

If you’re remotely familiar with “mom life” you know that unpredictable needs arise at a moment’s notice. BuzzFeed recently highlighted these daily realities by capturing the […]
October 4, 2009

Innovation Sighting: The Division Template in Elevators

What is the first thing you do when you step into an elevator? Push the button of the floor you are going to. Not so with a new breed of elevators manufactured by Schindler North America. These elevators have the buttons on the outside, not inside. The buttons for selecting your floor are on each floor. Instead of just pushing a single up or down button to hail an elevator, you push the button for the floor you want as though you were inside. The Division Template is the culprit here. In this innovation sighting, the elevator floor button panel was divided out and placed back into the system...outside the elevator cab. Very novel, useful, and surprising. To use Division, make a list of the components, then divide out a component. Divide functionally or physically and place it back somewhere in the system. Use Function Follows Form to identify potential benefits, feasibility, challenges, and adaptations.
January 25, 2010

Innovation Sighting: Task Unification with the iPhone

The iPhone is an incredible platform for innovation. As it becomes more popular, it invites even more innovation. Many of the iPhone's functions demonstrate the Task Unification template of the corporate innovation method called S.I.T.. Task Unification is a pattern of that assigns an additional job to an existing resource or component within a product or service. To use Task Unification is practice, we start by listing the components of the product or service. Then we assign non-intuitive tasks to some of the components randomly. The idea is to create weird, ambiguous "virtual products" that don't seem to make any sense. Then we work backwards from this hypothetical "solution" to a possible problem that it addresses. Linking the solution to a problem creates an idea.
March 8, 2010

Innovation Sighting: The Division Template on a Cell Phone

LG Electronics is getting ready to announce their third annual Design the Future Competition. Last year, more than 800 entries were submitted by consumers with their take on the future of mobile communications. The winning entry is the focus of this month's Innovation Sighting.
July 12, 2010

Innovation Sighting: Task Unification with Gifts

Task Unification is a hard working innovation tool. Task Unification assigns an additional task to an existing resource or component of the product or service. Here is a clever example from Springwise. It is a service called "Itizen." It allows you to physically tag a special item such as a gift or heirloom that links to a website where the collective history of that gift or heirloom is recorded and kept forever. Suppose your grandfather gives your son a hammer, for example, that he used to build the Brooklyn Bridge. Suppose grandpa then records in his own words the complete story about that hammer, where he got it (from his grandfather), how it was used, what else it has been used to build...well you get the picture.
October 25, 2010

Innovation Sighting: Innovating Political Elections with Division

The Division template of the corporate innovation method, S.I.T., works by listing the components of the product or service, then dividing out a component either physically, functionally, or by preserving the characteristics of the whole. Here is a unique example of the Division template with political elections. This idea comes from innovation consultant, Lauchlan Mackinnon, in his blog, Think Differently!!.
April 6, 2015

Innovation Sighting: Tales of Things

One way you can use the Task Unification Technique is to make an internal component take on the function of an external component in a Closed World. In effect, the internal component “steals” the external component’s function.