Innovation in Practice Blog

December 9, 2019

How to Enhance Innovation with Learning and Development Training

by Max Maccarone Innovation is an inescapable fact of being in business in today’s market. Advancements and developments in technology mean that nearly every industry has […]
August 13, 2019

Moms Who Dominate the Closed World Principle

If you’re remotely familiar with “mom life” you know that unpredictable needs arise at a moment’s notice. BuzzFeed recently highlighted these daily realities by capturing the […]
August 5, 2019

What is a Diaper Worth? An Example of Value and Pricing

When it comes to pricing a product, one principle rises above the rest.  A price is inextricably linked to the value a customer places on that […]
July 1, 2019
UNDER ARMOUR VIA U.S. PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

Task Unification: Under Armour ‘Smart Sneaker’ Uses Task Unification and Attribute Dependency

Wouldn’t your regular workout be that much better if recovery time was reduced to a minimum? Under Armour thinks so and has just filed a patent […]
June 3, 2019

Global Innovation Platform SOSA Partners with Elron

SOSA, the leading global innovation platform that connects international organizations to innovative technology, has entered into a strategic partnership with Elron, a top Israeli early stage investment […]
May 6, 2019

Featured in BBC Article

I had the privilege of recently being interviewed by Alex Hannaford, a BBC journalist for an article that ran last week. In his article, “How hindsight […]
April 16, 2019

Be a Catalyst for Change

Professors change the world, once student at a time. I’m regularly asked about my transition to academia. The first question I ask the professional considering the switch is whether he […]
March 25, 2019

Announcing LinkedIn Learning a-la-carte!

Many of you enjoy the benefit of sharpening your skills through LinkedIn Learning courses. To date, LinkedIn offers access to their entire course library via subscription. […]
February 27, 2019

Thinking Outside the Box About “Outside the Box”

Guest post by Bill Fanelli Last fall I attended a workshop led by author, marketing consultant, and University professor Drew Boyd. He challenged my thinking about […]
January 8, 2019

Now is the time to prepare

There are a lot of people standing in a lot of lines for academic positions. You need to find the lines that are most likely to lead to a job for you.
December 8, 2008

Innovation in Practice: One Year Later

A year of blogging in the innovation space has taught me a few things: Blogging is discovery. There are a lot of very bright people out there with many useful insights about how to make innovation happen. I’m impressed with the diversity of views and insights, as well as the constant stream of new thinking. Special recognition and thanks to: Amnon Levav, Yoni Stern, Jacob Goldenberg and the whole team at SIT for teaching me the method for innovating. Fellow bloggers like Jim Todhunter, Paul Sloane, Katy Konrath, Jeffrey Phillips, Keith Sawyer and many others for refreshing ideas about innovation. Chuck Frey for the way he recognizes and inspires others (thanks, Chuck!). Fellow J&J colleagues who push the envelope of innovation like Jeff Murphy, Mike Clem, and Shelly Cropper. Blogging is hard work. It takes a constant sense of awareness of what’s going on around you to spot new blog ideas. To be a good blogger, you need to be an even better at reading and commenting on other blogs (I learned this and everything else about blogging from Chris Allen). Blogging is a conversation. The long tail will prevail. (Read "The Cluetrain Manifesto" if you don’t believe me). I appreciate those of you who comment on this blog and take a different point-of-view. None of us is as smart as all of us. Blogging gets you noticed. Be careful what you say because people are paying attention. Readership of this blog is growing steadily, and the media and others are taking note.
June 4, 2012

Patterns That Predict Innovation Success

The New York Times published a list of "32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow," an eclectic mix of concepts that range from the wild and wacky like SpeechJammer (#14) to more practical ideas like a blood test for depression (#25). I analyzed each of the 32 concepts to see which ones could be explained by the five patterns of Systematic Inventive Thinking. These patterns are the "DNA" of products that can be extracted and applied to any product or service to create new-to-the-world innovations. Dr. Jacob Goldenberg found in his research that the majority of successful innovations conform to one or more of these patterns. Conversely, the majority of unsuccessful innovations (those that failed in the marketplace) do not conform to a pattern.