Innovation in Practice Blog

December 15, 2020

Where There’s Hope, There’s Creativity: The 5 Modes of Hoping

Do you feel like you’re never going to get any creative stuff going?  Well, never lose hope – because hope is a prerequisite to be creative. […]
December 8, 2020

What Makes Something Creative? The Characteristics of Highly Innovative Ideas

What is it about some products and services that make them more innovative and more creative than other products?  What is their secret ingredient? Well, it […]
December 1, 2020

Have You Reached Your Creative Peak?

Do you feel you’ve reached your optimum level of creativity? If not, when is that going to happen? And if yes, how do maintain that level […]
November 24, 2020

Finding Your Creative Sweet Spot: How to Make an Idea More Appealing

Not all ideas are equal. Some are okay, some are great. But don’t just throw those okay ideas away. The key is to find that creative […]
November 17, 2020

Six Best Books on Creativity: The Classics that Teach the How and Not the Why

If you like creativity and innovation, there are a lot of great books out there that cover just a wide range of topics. So how do […]
November 10, 2020

The Myth of Outside the Box Thinking: Why Brainstorming and Other Such Techniques Are Your Worst Enemy

How many brainstorming sessions have you been in? What really came out of it? What was the process like for you? How did you feel about […]
November 3, 2020

Five Ways to Teach Your Children to Be More Creative

If you think innovation is only for adults, well, you’re wrong – because kids can just be as innovative as adults are, even more sometimes.  Here […]
October 27, 2020

Learning the Powerful, Yet Abstract Method of Attribute Dependency

Attribute Dependency is one of the five techniques of the SIT (Systematic Inventive Thinking) method.  Just to give you an idea, think of your home thermostat […]
October 20, 2020

The Myth of Post-it Notes and Other Serendipitous Inventions: Why Pure Chance is Not Your Creative Friend

Chocolate chip cookies, penicillin, Velcro, microwave ovens, the game of basketball, and Post-It Notes. What do they have in common? Well, those products were invented completely […]
October 13, 2020

The Subtraction Technique: The Creative Power of Taking Elements Away

Subtraction is the removal of an essential core element rather than the addition of new systems or functions.  Like all the other techniques of the Systematic […]
November 16, 2009

Academic Focus: University of Michigan

Once you develop the capability to generate ideas, you need a rigorous approach to managing innovation within the context of your company's culture. For that, Professor Jeff DeGraff's Competing Values Framework (CVF) is the best-in-class approach. CVF describes four organizational cultural styles of managing innovation: Collaborate, Create, Control, and Compete. Management teams tend to gravitate towards one, dominant style, the one that has served them well in the past. To be a more effective, leaders need to be "ambidextrous." Leaders should become adroit at two conflicting values. "They must develop the ability to oversee teams that work towards opposite goals, integrating them when the timing is right, so that each value can be developed successfully."
January 4, 2010

Proposed Certificate Program in Innovation

Certificate programs are a way for universities and colleges to offer training that is less intensive and less expensive than traditional degree programs (baccalaureate, masters, doctoral). They are ideal for working professionals who want advanced training in highly focused areas. They are ideal for corporations as they are less expensive and a better value than many executive education (one week) programs. The world of innovation could benefit from such programs. While many institutions offer courses in creativity and innovation, very few have full degree or certificate programs in this field. Most of those tend to be technology/venture start-up oriented. Here are some examples:
March 29, 2010

Academic Focus: The Jerusalem Business School

What sets innovative products and services apart from others? Common sense would suggest they have unique and unusual characteristics that make them very different than all the rest. Furthermore, if you wanted to study innovative products and services to learn the hidden secrets they hold, you would try to identify those different and original attributes. But just the opposite is true. A very high percentage of successful new products launched each year follow the same set of patterns. Innovative products are more similar than different from each other. If you can identify these patterns and overlay them onto your products and services, you should be able to innovate in a predictable, templated way. THAT is the essence of the corporate innovation method, S.I.T..
April 19, 2010

Learn Innovation! Innovation Suite 2010

Here is an opportunity to learn innovation directly from the people who taught me. The course is called Innovation Suite 2010 and will be held in New York City from May 24-26, 2010. You can register for it at http://www.sitsite.com/academy/. Here are the goals of the course:
May 10, 2010

Research Priorities for Innovation

The Marketing Science Institute announced its research priorities for 2010 to 2012. The priorities are based on input from member company trustees and academic thought leaders. Topics are selected based on importance to marketers, need for more research-based knowledge, potential for achieving a more powerful conceptualization of a topic or issue, and the extent to which the topic can benefit from MSI’s capabilities in fostering collaboration between practitioners and academics.
May 18, 2010

Academic Focus: College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning

The College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning (DAAP) at the University of Cincinnati has as its primary mission the creation of a better visual and design environment.  […]
June 6, 2010

Academic Focus: City University London

A survey from IBM's Institute for Business Value shows that CEOs value one leadership competency above all others - creativity. It is therefore timely that the City University London formed its Centre for Creativity with a goal of becoming the UK leader in the teaching, research and transfer of creativity in professional practice, ranging from informatics and engineering to business and the arts. City is already a world-class centre of applied creativity research through activities in informatics, business, psychology, music and the arts. To achieve this objective it aims to achieve the following 3 sub-objectives:
July 19, 2010

The Role of Business Schools in Innovation

This is from the AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) in its new report, Business Schools on an Innovation Mission. The report addresses what is meant by innovation, describes how managerial talent contributes to innovation, and outlines ways business schools support innovation.
September 13, 2010

Academic Focus: Aalto University

The convergence of three worlds...commercial, technical, and design...creates the optimal conditions for innovation. Now a new university in Finland has done just that. Aalto University is a newly created university from the merger of the Helsinki School of Economics, the University of Art and Design Helsinki and Helsinki University of Technology - all leading and renowned institutions in their respective fields and in their own right.
October 3, 2010

Innovation Suite 2010 – New York City

SIT will be conducting its 5th innovation course in New York City from Nov 1-3, 2010. This course is designed for middle management and above, but most anyone can benefit from the learning experience. Participants of previous courses were Presidents, Marketing VPs and Directors, R&D VPs and Directors, Innovation Teams, and Product Directors from both large multinationals and smaller organizations. You can register for it at http://www.sitsite.com/academy/.