Innovation Sighting: Yet Another Multiplication in Cameras

Thanks to Light’s newest camera innovation, serious photographers may make it through their upcoming shot lists with a welcomed spring to their step. In attempt to lessen the load of the average DSLR camera, Light created the streamlined L16. Not surprisingly, the innovation of this camera reflects one of the five innovation templates in Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), the Multiplication Technique.

The Multiplication Technique is defined as copying an element already existing in the product or service but changing it in some counterintuitive way. Many innovations in cameras, including the basis of photography itself, are based on copying a component and then altering it. Utilizing this innovative pattern, Light replaced the typical DSLR lens with 16 smaller lenses, resulting in a compact camera which claims to provide the same quality photos as the standard DSLR.

As described in Tech Crunch:

The Light L16 is so-named because it has 16 camera modules, and it combines images from multiple modules at once to create images with greater depth, clarity, detail, color rendering and general quality than you’d otherwise be able to get out of a device that’s essentially the size of a thick smartphone. The L16’s sample images show depth-of-field and sharpness that would leave many DSLRs in the dust, in fact, which is the whole idea of the multi-module array.

The L16 is just one example of the benefit to creating with the use of innovation templates. To use the Multiplication Technique, begin by listing the components of the product, process, or service. You pick one of those components, make a copy of it. You keep the original component as is, but the copied component is changed. That creates the virtual product. Using Function Follows Form, you look for potential benefits, and you modify or adapt the concept to improve it to yield an innovative idea.

You can view the below video to see the Multiplication Technique at work in the L16.