Innovation Sighting: The Division Template on a Cell Phone

Innovating to Compete
March 1, 2010
Voice of the Emergent Customer
March 15, 2010

Innovation Sighting: The Division Template on a Cell Phone

LG Electronics is getting ready to announce their third annual Design the Future Competition. Last year, more than 800 entries were submitted by consumers with their take on the future of mobile communications. The winning entry is the focus of this month's Innovation Sighting.

LG Winners LG Electronics is about to announce their third annual Design the Future Competition.  Last year, more than 800 entries were submitted by consumers with their take on the future of mobile communications.  The winning entry is the focus of this month’s Innovation Sighting.  From LG:

“LG Electronics MobileComm U.S.A. Inc. (LG Mobile Phones) recently named Emily Albinski from Wading River, NY the winner of its 2nd Annual Design the Future Competition.  The idea competition challenged participants to create a concept to define the future of personal mobile communication.  First place winner Albinski, a professional full-time freelance designer, created the CC on the theme of connectivity. The winning concept of a modular phone, which could be used by LG in the future, includes a “core” phone that can be inserted into a touch screen or netbook shell depending on the user’s needs.  By design, the winning concept would allow users to connect in many different contexts and environments. Albinski, a science and technology enthusiast, refined and laid out her concept in just four days.”

Her concept demonstrates the Division Template of the corporate innovation method, S.I.T..  Division works by listing the components of the product or service, then dividing out a component either physically, functionally, or by preserving the characteristics of the whole.  Emily “divided” out functionality of the traditional cell phone, then embedded it into different environments and platforms to create new innovations.

Umbrella-today To make it even more interesting, it is useful sometimes to place the divided out function into less obvious environments.  For example, imagine the cell phone functionality is embedded into an alarm clock. A musical instrument.  An umbrella.  Using SOLUTION-TO-PROBLEM thinking, imagine how this would work.  What problems would it solve?  What benefits could it deliver?  Who would want such a device?  For example, perhaps your umbrella is notified when it should be carried with you that day.

Congratulations to Emily and all the winners.  I am looking forward to the next round!