Innovation in Practice: One Year Later

The LAB: Innovating a Fishing Pole with Multiplication (November 2008)
November 30, 2008
Teaching Your Children to Innovate
December 21, 2008

Innovation in Practice: One Year Later

A year of blogging in the innovation space has taught me a few things: Blogging is discovery. There are a lot of very bright people out there with many useful insights about how to make innovation happen. I’m impressed with the diversity of views and insights, as well as the constant stream of new thinking. Special recognition and thanks to: Amnon Levav, Yoni Stern, Jacob Goldenberg and the whole team at SIT for teaching me the method for innovating. Fellow bloggers like Jim Todhunter, Paul Sloane, Katy Konrath, Jeffrey Phillips, Keith Sawyer and many others for refreshing ideas about innovation. Chuck Frey for the way he recognizes and inspires others (thanks, Chuck!). Fellow J&J colleagues who push the envelope of innovation like Jeff Murphy, Mike Clem, and Shelly Cropper. Blogging is hard work. It takes a constant sense of awareness of what’s going on around you to spot new blog ideas. To be a good blogger, you need to be an even better at reading and commenting on other blogs (I learned this and everything else about blogging from Chris Allen). Blogging is a conversation. The long tail will prevail. (Read "The Cluetrain Manifesto" if you don’t believe me). I appreciate those of you who comment on this blog and take a different point-of-view. None of us is as smart as all of us. Blogging gets you noticed. Be careful what you say because people are paying attention. Readership of this blog is growing steadily, and the media and others are taking note.

A year of blogging in the innovation space has taught me a few things:

  • Blogging is discovery. There are a lot of very bright people out there with many useful insights about how to make innovation happen. I’m impressed with the diversity of views as well as the constant stream of new thinking.  Special recognition and thanks to:
    • Amnon Levav, Yoni Stern, Jacob Goldenberg and the whole team at SIT for teaching me the method of innovating.
    • Fellow bloggers like Jim Todhunter, Paul Sloane, Katy Konrath, Jeffrey Phillips, Keith Sawyer and many others for refreshing ideas about innovation.
    • Chuck Frey for the way he recognizes and inspires others (thanks, Chuck!).
    • Fellow J&J colleagues who push the envelope of innovation like Jeff Murphy, Mike Clem, Stuart Morgan, and Shelly Cropper.
  • Blogging is hard work. It takes a constant sense of awareness of what’s going on around you to spot new blog ideas. To be a good blogger, you need to be even better at reading and commenting on other blogs (I learned this and everything else about blogging from Chris Allen).
  • Blogging is a conversation. The long tail will prevail. (Read “The Cluetrain Manifesto” if you don’t believe me). I appreciate those of you who comment on this blog and take a different point-of-view. None of us is as smart as all of us.
  • Blogging gets you noticed. Be careful what you say because people are paying attention. Readership of this blog is growing steadily, and the media and others are taking note.

What is ahead for 2009?

  • The LAB: I enjoy this and I hope my readers do as well. My point is to spend an hour or two at most on a product or service, selected at random. Then I use an innovation tool to create interesting and useful new-to-the-world inventions. Innovation is a skill, not a gift, and anyone can learn it. My hope is to inspire others to do so.
  • Innovation on Request: This is a new feature where I plan invite readers to submit things they need innovated. No strings attached, no property rights issues, no fees. Just pure innovation to continue to make the point that all of us need to acquire these skills if we want to remain productive and competitive in the global marketplace.
  • Guest blogging on other sites. I like this idea, and I plan to follow through with other bloggers that have asked me to do that.
  • New Blog Design: I will be launching a new blog design reflecting the theme of the corporate perspective. All businesses, large and small, need innovation. Within the corporate walls, innovation is sought after, brokered, and driven. The corporate perspective on what, why, when, who, and how innovation happens is the focus here. I want to continue sharing what’s inside those walls.

Drew